CALIFORNIA CRAZY: CITY WILL FINE COUPLE $500 FOR NOT WATERING BROWN LAWN, STATE WILL FINE’EM $500 IF THEY DO

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  • CALIFORNIA CITY WILL FINE COUPLE $500 FOR NOT WATERING BROWN LAWN, STATE WILL FINE’EM $500 IF THEY DO

    SOURCE: CONSUMERIST

    Say What?In the epitome of a damned if you do, damned if you don’t situation, Laura and Mark received notice from Glendora, Calif. that they’d get a $500 penalty for not watering their brown lawn… on the same day the state approved mandatory outdoor watering restrictions with the same fine for violating that attached, $500. Why is the lawn brown? Because they’re conserving water. Why are they conserving water? Because California asked them to — the state water board chairman even called brown lawns in Cali a “badge of honor.” But Mom and dad aren’t communicating effectively, it seems. “Despite the water conservation efforts, we wish to remind you that limited watering is still required to keep landscaping looking healthy and green,” says the letter, according to the Associated Press, setting a 60-day deadline to get the brown green again.

    They’re not alone in the confusion, Laura adds.

    “My friends in Los Angeles got these letters warning they could be fined if they water, and I got a letter warning that I could be fined for not watering,” she explains. “I felt like I was in an alternate universe.”

    While there’s nothing on the books that says local governments can’t fine citizens for brown lawns, Gov. Jerry Brown’s office isn’t a fan of those fees, either.

    “These efforts to conserve should not be undermined by the short-sighted actions of a few local jurisdictions, who chose to ignore the statewide crisis we face, the farmers and farmworkers losing their livelihoods, the communities facing drinking water shortages and the state’s shrinking reservoirs,” said Amy Norris, a spokeswoman for the California Environmental Protection Agency, in a written statement.

    “It’s almost crazy because one agency is telling you one thing and another is forcing you to do the opposite,” she said.

    Please note, the views expressed herein are the views of the author exclusively and not necessarily the views of Somicom or any other Somicom authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners, technicians or affiliated websites.

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